Families owning homes with a high housing cost burden by race and ethnicity

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Definitions: The percentage of families who own their homes and are spending more than 30 percent of the family income on housing, by race and ethnicity. Families that spend more than 30 percent of their income on housing are considered to have a high housing cost burden.

The U.S. Census uses these race categories: White, Black or African American, American Indian/Alaska Native, Asian, Native Hawaiian/Other Pacific Islander, Some Other Race, and Two or More Races. In addition, the U.S. Census uses two ethnic categories: Hispanic and Non-Hispanic. Hispanic (or Latino) refers to a person of Cuban, Mexican, Puerto Rican, South or Central American, or other Spanish culture or origin, regardless of race. The term 'origin' is used to indicate a person's (or the person's parents) heritage, nationality group, lineage, or country of birth. People who identify their origin as Spanish or Hispanic may be of any race.  

Data Source: U.S. Census, American Community Survey, 1-year estimates, Table S0201.

Footnotes: Estimates for other races and ethnicities are suppressed because the confidence interval around the percentage is greater than or equal to ten percentage points.
County-level data available by request.

Updated October 2017.