Children Ages 0-4 Experiencing Homelessness in Michigan

Change Indicator

Why This Indicator Matters

It is during the earliest years of life that the very architecture of children’s brains is built in ways that can affect their emotional and cognitive development, as well as their later outcomes in school and life. Trauma such as homelessness can change the makeup of a developing brain, leading to lifelong educational implications before a child even starts school.
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Definitions: An estimate of the number of children ages 0-4 who experienced homelessness during the school year.

The estimate of homeless 0-4 year old children in the state is calculated based on 5 Year ACS estimate of the 0-4 population by county and multiplied by the percent homeless for 1st graders by county. This is as accurate an estimate of the 0-4 population that exists, and a very conservative estimate of the 0-4 year old homeless rate.

Data Source:

Poverty Solutions at the University of Michigan

Footnotes:

1. All numbers less than 10 have been redacted in accordance with FERPA

2. The estimate of homeless 0-4 year old children in the state is calculated based on 5 Year ACS estimate of the 0-4 population by county and multiplied by the percent homeless for 1st graders by county. This is as accurate an estimate of the 0-4 population that exists, and a very conservative estimate of the 0-4 year old homeless rate.

3. "Homeless" is defined as the total number of students who experienced homelessness during School Year 2016-17

4. Data by county are based on the address of the school where the student attended for the longest time rather than the address of the student due to the fact that homeless students are highly mobile. All counts and percentages are therefore reflective of students attending school within the counties, but not necessarily living in the county.


NOTE: This research result used data structured and maintained by the MERI-Michigan Education Data Center (MEDC). MEDC data is modified for analysis purposes using rules governed by MEDC and are not identical to those data collected and maintained by the Michigan Department of Education (MDE) and/or Michigan’s Center for Educational Performance and Information (CEPI). Results, information and opinions solely represent the analysis, information and opinions of the author(s) and are not endorsed by, or reflect the views or positions of, grantors, MDE and CEPI or any employee thereof.