Selected KIDS COUNT Indicators for School District in Massachusetts

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Free and reduced price lunch enrollment rates by school district (Percent)

Location Data Type 2010 - 2011 2011 - 2012 2012 - 2013 2013 - 2014 2014 - 2015
Massachusetts
Percent
36%
37%
38%
41%
44%
Reading
Percent
6%
7%
7%
8%
11%
Location Data Type 2010 - 2011 2011 - 2012 2012 - 2013 2013 - 2014 2014 - 2015
Massachusetts
Percent
36%
37%
38%
41%
44%
Reading
Percent
6%
7%
7%
8%
11%
Modify Tables: Most Recent Year All Available Years: Raw Data Explore Data >

Why This Indicator Matters

Are free and reduced-price school meals getting to all the kids who need them? See Breakfast and Lunch Participation in Massachusetts Schools—part of a joint project involving MassBudget, the Center for Social Policy at UMass Boston, and the Mass. Law Reform Institute, supported by the Eos Foundation.

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Definitions:

Students enrolled in the free or reduced price lunch program for a given school district as a share of total student enrollment.

Students living in households up to 130% of the federal poverty level (FPL) are eligible for free meals. Students living in households between 130% and 185% of FPL are eligible for reduced price meals. Students are categorically eligible for free meals if they are homeless or if anyone in the household is on TAFDC or SNAP, meaning that many children between 130-200% of FPL still have access to free school meals. Further, children in foster care are categorically eligible for free meals even when living in households above 200% of FPL. Moreover, the “Community Eligibility Provision” allows high need schools or districts with 40% or more students who are categorically eligible to serve free meals to all students.

NA – Data not available.

Data Source: Data from the Mass. Department of Elementary and Secondary Education, analysis of meal count data (National School Lunch Program)

Footnotes: These data on the number of students receiving free and reduced lunch and the MA Kids Count indicator on low-income students are essentially the same measure.  The numbers differ slightly based on the time of collection and source of the data.

Economically disadvantaged students by school district (Percent & Number)

Location Data Type 2015 - 2016 2016 - 2017 2017 - 2018 2018 - 2019 2019 - 2020
Massachusetts
Number
260,998
288,465
305,203
297,120
310,873
Massachusetts
Percent
27.4%
30.2%
32.0%
31.2%
32.8%
Reading
Number
292
308
361
349
311
Reading
Percent
6.6%
7.1%
8.6%
8.3%
7.5%
Location Data Type 2015 - 2016 2016 - 2017 2017 - 2018 2018 - 2019 2019 - 2020
Massachusetts
Number
260,998
288,465
305,203
297,120
310,873
Massachusetts
Percent
27.4%
30.2%
32.0%
31.2%
32.8%
Reading
Number
292
308
361
349
311
Reading
Percent
6.6%
7.1%
8.6%
8.3%
7.5%
Modify Tables: Most Recent Year All Available Years: Raw Data Explore Data >

Why This Indicator Matters

Education funding reforms that could help children in all of our communities reach their full potential would expand opportunity now and play an important role in strengthening our economy in the long run. The education funding formula (“Chapter 70”) has not been systematically updated in twenty-five years, and it fails to provide the funding needed for school districts to fund core expenses. In wealthier districts, local taxes have been able to fill gaps, allowing schools to provide the educational supports and opportunities students need to succeed. In school districts with larger numbers of low-income (“economically disadvantaged”) students, the amounts schools are able to spend on core expenses are well below what is needed. See MassBudget’s report, Building an Education System that Works for Everyone: Funding Reforms to Help All Our Children Thrive.

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Definitions:

Economically disadvantaged data are based on a student's participation in one or more of the following state-administered programs: the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP); the Transitional Assistance for Families with Dependent Children (TAFDC); the Department of Children and Families' (DCF) foster care program; and students in families up to 133% of the federal poverty level enrolled in MassHealth (Medicaid). Counts come from computerized data matches of school enrollment rosters with these specific program membership lists.

 

NA – Data not available for this district for this year (such as before the district was created, or after two districts merged).

S – Data suppressed when the number is less than 10.

Data Source:

From the Mass. Department of Elementary and Secondary Education Selected Populations Report

http://profiles.doe.mass.edu/statereport/selectedpopulations.aspx

Footnotes:

Data as of October of the given school year.

Updated May 2020 with data from January 2020.

Economically disadvantaged students by school district (Percent & Number)

Location Data Type 2015 - 2016 2016 - 2017 2017 - 2018 2018 - 2019 2019 - 2020
Massachusetts
Number
260,998
288,465
305,203
297,120
310,873
Massachusetts
Percent
27.4%
30.2%
32.0%
31.2%
32.8%
Reading
Number
292
308
361
349
311
Reading
Percent
6.6%
7.1%
8.6%
8.3%
7.5%
Location Data Type 2015 - 2016 2016 - 2017 2017 - 2018 2018 - 2019 2019 - 2020
Massachusetts
Number
260,998
288,465
305,203
297,120
310,873
Massachusetts
Percent
27.4%
30.2%
32.0%
31.2%
32.8%
Reading
Number
292
308
361
349
311
Reading
Percent
6.6%
7.1%
8.6%
8.3%
7.5%
Modify Tables: Most Recent Year All Available Years: Raw Data Explore Data >

Why This Indicator Matters

Education funding reforms that could help children in all of our communities reach their full potential would expand opportunity now and play an important role in strengthening our economy in the long run. The education funding formula (“Chapter 70”) has not been systematically updated in twenty-five years, and it fails to provide the funding needed for school districts to fund core expenses. In wealthier districts, local taxes have been able to fill gaps, allowing schools to provide the educational supports and opportunities students need to succeed. In school districts with larger numbers of low-income (“economically disadvantaged”) students, the amounts schools are able to spend on core expenses are well below what is needed. See MassBudget’s report, Building an Education System that Works for Everyone: Funding Reforms to Help All Our Children Thrive.

show more

Definitions:

Economically disadvantaged data are based on a student's participation in one or more of the following state-administered programs: the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP); the Transitional Assistance for Families with Dependent Children (TAFDC); the Department of Children and Families' (DCF) foster care program; and students in families up to 133% of the federal poverty level enrolled in MassHealth (Medicaid). Counts come from computerized data matches of school enrollment rosters with these specific program membership lists.

 

NA – Data not available for this district for this year (such as before the district was created, or after two districts merged).

S – Data suppressed when the number is less than 10.

Data Source:

From the Mass. Department of Elementary and Secondary Education Selected Populations Report

http://profiles.doe.mass.edu/statereport/selectedpopulations.aspx

Footnotes:

Data as of October of the given school year.

Updated May 2020 with data from January 2020.

Free and reduced price lunch enrollment rates by school district (Percent)

Location Data Type 2010 - 2011 2011 - 2012 2012 - 2013 2013 - 2014 2014 - 2015
Massachusetts
Percent
36%
37%
38%
41%
44%
Reading
Percent
6%
7%
7%
8%
11%
Location Data Type 2010 - 2011 2011 - 2012 2012 - 2013 2013 - 2014 2014 - 2015
Massachusetts
Percent
36%
37%
38%
41%
44%
Reading
Percent
6%
7%
7%
8%
11%
Modify Tables: Most Recent Year All Available Years: Raw Data Explore Data >

Why This Indicator Matters

Are free and reduced-price school meals getting to all the kids who need them? See Breakfast and Lunch Participation in Massachusetts Schools—part of a joint project involving MassBudget, the Center for Social Policy at UMass Boston, and the Mass. Law Reform Institute, supported by the Eos Foundation.

show more

Definitions:

Students enrolled in the free or reduced price lunch program for a given school district as a share of total student enrollment.

Students living in households up to 130% of the federal poverty level (FPL) are eligible for free meals. Students living in households between 130% and 185% of FPL are eligible for reduced price meals. Students are categorically eligible for free meals if they are homeless or if anyone in the household is on TAFDC or SNAP, meaning that many children between 130-200% of FPL still have access to free school meals. Further, children in foster care are categorically eligible for free meals even when living in households above 200% of FPL. Moreover, the “Community Eligibility Provision” allows high need schools or districts with 40% or more students who are categorically eligible to serve free meals to all students.

NA – Data not available.

Data Source: Data from the Mass. Department of Elementary and Secondary Education, analysis of meal count data (National School Lunch Program)

Footnotes: These data on the number of students receiving free and reduced lunch and the MA Kids Count indicator on low-income students are essentially the same measure.  The numbers differ slightly based on the time of collection and source of the data.