About
State KIDS COUNT
National KIDS COUNT

New Hampshire

New Futures

Rebecca Woitowski, Early Childhood Policy Coordinator

New Futures is a nonpartisan, nonprofit organization that advocates, educates and collaborates to improve the health and wellness of all New Hampshire residents.

Featured Data

Child population by gender
Total population by child and adult populations
Child population by single age
Child population by age group
Child population by race
Child population by race and age group
Children under age 6 in family-based childcare
Children who have been suspended from school by race
Children who have been expelled from school by race
Children under age 6 with all available parents in the labor force (2000-2007 series)
Children ages 6 to 12 with all available parents in the labor force (2000-2007 series)
Low-income working families with children (2000-2007 series)
Children in low-income working families by age group (2000-2007 series)
Children living in low-income households where no adults work (2000-2007 series)
Children with at least one unemployed parent
Median family income among households with children
Children in families that receive public assistance
Number of participants in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program
Percent who participated in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program
Children living in households with a high housing cost burden
Family income is only one factor of financial security; the cost of basic expenses also matters. Housing is typically one of the largest expenses that families face. Low-income families, in particular, are unlikely to be able to meet all of their basic needs if housing consumes nearly one-third or more of their income.

This indicator is included in the KIDS COUNT Child Well-Being Index. Read the KIDS COUNT Data Book to learn more: http://datacenter.kidscount.org/publications.
Children in low-income households with a high housing cost burden
Children in poverty (100 percent poverty)
Growing up in poverty is one of the greatest threats to healthy child development. Poverty and financial stress can impede children’s cognitive development and their ability to learn. It can contribute to behavioral, social and emotional problems and poor health.

This indicator is included in the KIDS COUNT Child Well-Being Index. Read the KIDS COUNT Data Book to learn more: http://datacenter.kidscount.org/publications.
Children in poverty by age group
Growing up in poverty is one of the greatest threats to healthy child development. Poverty and financial stress can impede children’s cognitive development and their ability to learn. It can contribute to behavioral, social and emotional problems and poor health.

This indicator is included in the KIDS COUNT Child Well-Being Index. Read the KIDS COUNT Data Book to learn more: http://datacenter.kidscount.org/publications.
Population in poverty
Children ages 0 to 8 below 200 percent poverty
Children in poverty by race and ethnicity
Children below 200 percent poverty by race
Children living in households with a high housing cost burden by race
Median family income among households with children by race and ethnicity
Child population by household type
Children in the care of grandparents
Children who have experienced two or more adverse experiences (2011-2012)
Children who have experienced two or more adverse experiences by race and ethnicity (2011-2012)
Children who have one or more emotional, behavioral, or developmental conditions (2007 and 2011-2012)
Children who are subject to an investigated report
Children who are confirmed by child protective services as victims of maltreatment (2000-2014)
Children in foster care
Children in foster care by age group
Marijuana use by age group
Teens ages 12 to 17 who abused alcohol or drugs in the past year (2005-2014)
Economic Well-Being Rank
Family and community rank
Children age 3 to 5 enrolled in nursery school, preschool or kindergarten, by race and ethnicity
Children who live with a householder who has at least a high school diploma, by race and ethnicity
Children who live in families with incomes at or above 200 percent of poverty, by race and ethnicity
Children ages 0 to 5 whose parents report that child care issues affected their employment, by income level
Child population by age group
Child population by race and Hispanic or Latino origin
Children enrolled in preschool and kindergarten
Licensed center and family-based child care capacity
Median income for families with children
Living wage
New Hampshire applies the federal minimum wage of $7.25.
Annual average unemployment
Infants and children under 5 years enrolled in WIC

Free/reduced school lunch eligibility
Children under 18 enrolled in SNAP
Median monthly gross rental cost
Poverty among families and children under 18 years of age
High risk births
Low weight births
Children under age 18 enrolled in Medicaid/CHIP
Child and young adult deaths by accident
Child and young adult deaths by suicide
Children and youth served by community mental health centers
Substantiated child maltreatment victims
Not only does child maltreatment lead to the immediate suffering of children, but there are also numerous long-term adverse effects. These can include lasting physical consequences such as brain damage, as well as cognitive delays or educational difficulties and increased likelihood of depression, anxiety, and engagement in high-risk behaviors. Abused and neglected youth are also at an increased risk of drug and alcohol abuse, juvenile delinquency, criminality, and perpetuating the cycle of abuse by becoming abusers themselves (CWIG, 2013). Finally, child maltreatment can result in the death of a child (US DHHS, 2016).
Children in out-of-home placements
In New Hampshire, child safety concerns are addressed by the Child Protection Services (CPS) division of the Department of Children, Youth, and Families (DCYF). The state of New Hampshire is legally responsible for children placed in out-of-home care. Nearly two-thirds of New Hampshire youth in CPS out-of-home placements between 2003 and 2012 were under the age of 10. More than one in ten New Hampshire youth who have been in out-of-home placements in the past are placed out of the home again after returning to their families. Rates of returning to out-of-home placements by youth’s county of residence were found to be as high as one in five in Sullivan County (20.9 percent) and Merrimack County (20.7 percent) (Boakye, Lim, and Ogren, 2014).
Students who have taken a prescription drug without a doctor's prescription one or more times during the past 30 days
Students who used marijuana one or more times during the past 30 days
Students who had five or more drinks of alcohol in a row on one or more of the past 30 days
Students who had at least one drink of alcohol on one or more of the past 30 days