Selected KIDS COUNT Indicators for State in Indiana

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Children whose parents lack secure employment (Number & Percent)

Location Data Type 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015
United StatesNumber23,777,00023,101,00022,837,00022,061,00021,363,000
United StatesPercent32%31%31%30%29%
IndianaNumber527,000474,000475,000474,000447,000
IndianaPercent33%30%30%30%28%
Location Data Type 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015
United StatesNumber23,777,00023,101,00022,837,00022,061,00021,363,000
United StatesPercent32%31%31%30%29%
IndianaNumber527,000474,000475,000474,000447,000
IndianaPercent33%30%30%30%28%
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Indicator Context

Children living in families lacking secure parental employment are vulnerable. Without at least one parent employed full time, children are more likely to fall into poverty. Yet too many parents who want full-time work are forced to piece together part-time or temporary jobs that do not provide sufficient or stable income; some lack the education and skills needed to secure a good job. Even a full-time job at low wages does not necessarily lift a family out of poverty.

This indicator is part of the KIDS COUNT Child Well-Being Index. Read the KIDS COUNT Data Book to learn more: http://datacenter.kidscount.org/publications.

Definitions: The share of all children under age 18 living in families where no parent has regular, full-time employment.

For children living in single-parent families, this means the resident parent did not work at least 35 hours per week, at least 50 weeks in the 12 months prior to the survey. For children living in married-couple families, this means neither parent worked at least 35 hours per week, at least 50 weeks in the 12 months prior to the survey. Children living with neither parent were listed as not having secure parental employment because those children are likely to be economically vulnerable. Children under age 18 who are householders, spouses of householders, or unmarried partners of householders were excluded from this analysis. This measure is very similar to the measure called "Secure Parental Employment," used by the Federal Interagency Forum on Child and Family Statistics in its publication America's Children: Key National Indicators of Well-Being.

Data Source: Population Reference Bureau, analysis of data from the U.S. Census Bureau, 2008 - 2015 American Community Survey.

Footnotes: Updated December 2016.
S – Estimates suppressed when the confidence interval around the percentage is greater than or equal to 10 percentage points.
N.A. – Data not available.
Data are provided for the 50 most populous cities according to the most recent Census counts.  Cities for which data is collected may change over time.
A 90 percent confidence interval for each estimate can be found at Children whose parents lack secure employment.

Children living in households with a high housing cost burden (Number & Percent)

Location Data Type 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015
United StatesNumber29,486,00027,761,00026,339,00025,710,00024,646,000
United StatesPercent40%38%36%35%33%
IndianaNumber487,000450,000437,000434,000399,000
IndianaPercent31%28%28%27%25%
Location Data Type 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015
United StatesNumber29,486,00027,761,00026,339,00025,710,00024,646,000
United StatesPercent40%38%36%35%33%
IndianaNumber487,000450,000437,000434,000399,000
IndianaPercent31%28%28%27%25%
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Indicator Context

Family income is only one factor of financial security; the cost of basic expenses also matters. Housing is typically one of the largest expenses that families face. Low-income families, in particular, are unlikely to be able to meet all of their basic needs if housing consumes nearly one-third or more of their income.

This indicator is included in the KIDS COUNT Child Well-Being Index. Read the KIDS COUNT Data Book to learn more: http://datacenter.kidscount.org/publications.

Definitions: The share of children living in households where more than 30 percent of the monthly income was spent on rent, mortgage payments, taxes, insurance, and/or related expenses.

The 30 percent threshold for housing costs is based on research on affordable housing by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban development (HUD). According to HUD, households that must allocate more than 30 percent of their income to housing expenses are less likely to have enough resources for food, clothing, medical care or other needs.

Data Source: Population Reference Bureau, analysis of data from the U.S. Census Bureau, 2005 through 2015 American Community Survey.
Beginning in January 2005, the U.S. Census Bureau expanded the ACS sample to 3 million households (full implementation), and in January 2006 the ACS included group quarters. The ACS, fully implemented, is designed to provide annually updated social, economic, and housing data for states and communities. (Such local-area data have traditionally been collected once every ten years in the long form of the decennial census.)

Footnotes: Updated December 2016.
S - Estimates suppressed when the confidence interval around the
percentage is greater than or equal to 10 percentage points.
N.A. – Data not available.
Data are provided for the 50 most populous cities according to the most recent Census counts.  Cities for which data is collected may change over time.
A 90 percent confidence interval for each estimate can be found at
Children living in households with a high housing cost burden .

Children in poverty (100 percent poverty) (Number & Percent)

Location Data Type 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015
United StatesNumber16,387,00016,397,00016,087,00015,686,00015,000,000
United StatesPercent23%23%22%22%21%
IndianaNumber361,000350,000345,000333,000323,000
IndianaPercent23%22%22%22%21%
Location Data Type 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015
United StatesNumber16,387,00016,397,00016,087,00015,686,00015,000,000
United StatesPercent23%23%22%22%21%
IndianaNumber361,000350,000345,000333,000323,000
IndianaPercent23%22%22%22%21%
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Indicator Context

Growing up in poverty is one of the greatest threats to healthy child development. Poverty and financial stress can impede children’s cognitive development and their ability to learn. It can contribute to behavioral, social and emotional problems and poor health.

This indicator is included in the KIDS COUNT Child Well-Being Index. Read the KIDS COUNT Data Book to learn more: http://datacenter.kidscount.org/publications.

Definitions: The share of children under age 18 who live in families with incomes below the federal poverty level.

The federal poverty definition consists of a series of thresholds based on family size and composition. In calendar year 2015, a family of two adults and two children fell in the “poverty” category if their annual income fell below $24,036. Poverty status is not determined for people in military barracks, institutional quarters, or for unrelated individuals under age 15 (such as foster children).  The data are based on income received in the 12 months prior to the survey.

Data Source: Population Reference Bureau, analysis of data from the U.S. Census Bureau, Census 2000 Supplementary Survey, 2001 Supplementary Survey, 2002 through 2015 American Community Survey.

These data were derived from American Fact Finder table B17001 (factfinder2.census.gov/).


The data for this measure come from the 2000 and 2001 Supplementary Survey and the 2002 through 2015 American Community Survey (ACS). The 2000 through 2004 ACS surveyed approximately 700,000 households monthly during each calendar year. In general but particularly for these years, use caution when interpreting estimates for less populous states or indicators representing small sub-populations, where the sample size is relatively small. Beginning in January 2005, the U.S. Census Bureau expanded the ACS sample to 3 million households (full implementation), and in January 2006 the ACS included group quarters. The ACS, fully implemented, is designed to provide annually updated social, economic, and housing data for states and communities. (Such local-area data have traditionally been collected once every ten years in the long form of the decennial census.)

Footnotes: Updated September 2016.
S - Estimates suppressed when the confidence interval around the percentage is greater than or equal to 10 percentage points.
N.A. – Data not available.
Data are provided for the 50 most populous cities according to the most recent Census counts.  Cities for which data is collected may change over time.
A 90 percent confidence interval for each estimate can be found at Children in poverty (100 percent poverty).

Fourth grade reading achievement levels (Percent)

Location Achievement Level Data Type 2007 2009 2011 2013 2015
United StatesBelow basicPercent34%34%34%33%32%
United StatesAt or above basicPercent66%66%66%67%68%
United StatesBelow proficientPercent68%68%68%66%65%
United StatesAt or above proficientPercent32%32%32%34%35%
IndianaBelow basicPercent32%30%32%27%25%
IndianaAt or above basicPercent68%70%68%73%75%
IndianaBelow proficientPercent67%66%67%62%60%
IndianaAt or above proficientPercent33%34%33%38%40%
Location Achievement Level Data Type 2007 2009 2011 2013 2015
United StatesBelow basicPercent34%34%34%33%32%
United StatesAt or above basicPercent66%66%66%67%68%
United StatesBelow proficientPercent68%68%68%66%65%
United StatesAt or above proficientPercent32%32%32%34%35%
IndianaBelow basicPercent32%30%32%27%25%
IndianaAt or above basicPercent68%70%68%73%75%
IndianaBelow proficientPercent67%66%67%62%60%
IndianaAt or above proficientPercent33%34%33%38%40%
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Indicator Context

Proficiency in reading by the end of third grade is a crucial marker in a child's educational development. In the early years, learning to read is a critical component of education. But beginning in fourth grade, children use reading to learn other subjects, and therefore, mastery of reading becomes a critical component in their ability to keep up academically. Children who reach fourth grade without being able to read proficiently are more likely to drop out of high school, reducing their earnings potential and changes for success.

This indicator is part of the KIDS COUNT Child Well-Being Index. Read our KIDS COUNT Data Book to learn more about how children are faring.

Additional resources:
Early Warning Confirmed: A Research Update on Third-Grade Reading 2010 KIDS COUNT Special Report: Why Reading by the End of Third Grade Matters

Definitions: Fourth grade public school students’ reading achievement levels, as measured and defined by the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) reading test.

For a more detailed description of achievement levels see: http://nces.ed.gov/nationsreportcard/Reading/achieveall.asp. Public schools include charter schools and exclude Bureau of Indian Education schools and Department of Defense Education Activity schools.

Data Source: U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics, National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP).  Available online at http://nces.ed.gov/nationsreportcard/.

Footnotes: Updated November 2015.
S – NAEP reporting standards not met.
N.A. – Data not available.
A 90 percent confidence interval file may be found at Fourth grade reading achievement levels.

Eighth grade math achievement levels (Percent)

Location Achievement Level Data Type 2007 2009 2011 2013 2015
United StatesBelow basicPercent30%29%28%27%30%
United StatesAt or above basicPercent70%71%72%73%70%
United StatesBelow proficientPercent69%67%66%66%68%
United StatesAt or above proficientPercent31%33%34%34%32%
IndianaBelow basicPercent24%22%23%23%23%
IndianaAt or above basicPercent76%78%77%77%77%
IndianaBelow proficientPercent65%64%66%62%61%
IndianaAt or above proficientPercent35%36%34%38%39%
Location Achievement Level Data Type 2007 2009 2011 2013 2015
United StatesBelow basicPercent30%29%28%27%30%
United StatesAt or above basicPercent70%71%72%73%70%
United StatesBelow proficientPercent69%67%66%66%68%
United StatesAt or above proficientPercent31%33%34%34%32%
IndianaBelow basicPercent24%22%23%23%23%
IndianaAt or above basicPercent76%78%77%77%77%
IndianaBelow proficientPercent65%64%66%62%61%
IndianaAt or above proficientPercent35%36%34%38%39%
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Indicator Context

Competence in mathematics is essential for success in the workplace, which increasingly requires higher-level technical skills. Students who take advanced math and science courses that require a strong mastery of math fundamentals are more likely to attend and complete college and have higher earnings over time.

This indicator is included in the KIDS COUNT Child Well-Being Index. Read the KIDS COUNT Data Book to learn more: http://datacenter.kidscount.org/publications.

Definitions: Eighth grade public school students’ mathematics achievement levels, as measured and defined by the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP).
For a more detailed description of achievement levels see: http://nces.ed.gov/nationsreportcard/Mathematics/achieveall.asp. Public schools include charter schools and exclude Bureau of Indian Education schools and Department of Defense Education Activity schools.

Data Source: U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics, National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP). Available online at http://nces.ed.gov/nationsreportcard

Footnotes: Updated November 2015.
S – NAEP reporting standards not met.
N.A. – Data not available.
A 90 percent confidence interval for each estimate can be found at Eighth grade math achievement levels.

Children by household head’s educational attainment (Number & Percent)

Location Education Level Data Type 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015
United StatesNot a high school graduateNumber11,131,00010,887,00010,533,00010,412,00010,137,000
United StatesNot a high school graduatePercent15%15%14%14%14%
United StatesHigh school diploma or GEDNumber34,617,00034,157,00033,544,00032,958,00032,801,000
United StatesHigh school diploma or GEDPercent47%46%46%45%45%
United StatesAssociate's degreeNumber6,469,0006,564,0006,690,0006,783,0006,827,000
United StatesAssociate's degreePercent9%9%9%9%9%
United StatesBachelor's degreeNumber13,366,00013,501,00014,044,00014,218,00014,446,000
United StatesBachelor's degreePercent18%18%19%19%20%
United StatesGraduate degreeNumber8,103,0008,387,0008,670,0008,992,0009,210,000
United StatesGraduate degreePercent11%11%12%12%13%
IndianaNot a high school graduateNumber202,000204,000187,000186,000189,000
IndianaNot a high school graduatePercent13%13%12%12%12%
IndianaHigh school diploma or GEDNumber817,000811,000801,000781,000758,000
IndianaHigh school diploma or GEDPercent51%51%50%49%48%
IndianaAssociate's degreeNumber162,000161,000169,000168,000168,000
IndianaAssociate's degreePercent10%10%11%11%11%
IndianaBachelor's degreeNumber275,000273,000285,000297,000313,000
IndianaBachelor's degreePercent17%17%18%19%20%
IndianaGraduate degreeNumber137,000135,000142,000146,000148,000
IndianaGraduate degreePercent9%9%9%9%9%
Location Education Level Data Type 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015
United StatesNot a high school graduateNumber11,131,00010,887,00010,533,00010,412,00010,137,000
United StatesNot a high school graduatePercent15%15%14%14%14%
United StatesHigh school diploma or GEDNumber34,617,00034,157,00033,544,00032,958,00032,801,000
United StatesHigh school diploma or GEDPercent47%46%46%45%45%
United StatesAssociate's degreeNumber6,469,0006,564,0006,690,0006,783,0006,827,000
United StatesAssociate's degreePercent9%9%9%9%9%
United StatesBachelor's degreeNumber13,366,00013,501,00014,044,00014,218,00014,446,000
United StatesBachelor's degreePercent18%18%19%19%20%
United StatesGraduate degreeNumber8,103,0008,387,0008,670,0008,992,0009,210,000
United StatesGraduate degreePercent11%11%12%12%13%
IndianaNot a high school graduateNumber202,000204,000187,000186,000189,000
IndianaNot a high school graduatePercent13%13%12%12%12%
IndianaHigh school diploma or GEDNumber817,000811,000801,000781,000758,000
IndianaHigh school diploma or GEDPercent51%51%50%49%48%
IndianaAssociate's degreeNumber162,000161,000169,000168,000168,000
IndianaAssociate's degreePercent10%10%11%11%11%
IndianaBachelor's degreeNumber275,000273,000285,000297,000313,000
IndianaBachelor's degreePercent17%17%18%19%20%
IndianaGraduate degreeNumber137,000135,000142,000146,000148,000
IndianaGraduate degreePercent9%9%9%9%9%
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Definitions: The share of all children under age 18 living in households by the head of household’s educational attainment.

The data for this measure come from the 2000 and 2001 Supplementary Survey and the 2002 through 2015 American Community Survey (ACS). The 2000 through 2004 ACS surveyed approximately 700,000 households monthly during each calendar year. In general but particularly for these years, use caution when interpreting estimates for less populous states or indicators representing small subpopulations, where the sample size is relatively small. Beginning in January 2005, the U.S. Census Bureau expanded the ACS sample to 3 million households (full implementation), and in January 2006 the ACS included group quarters. The ACS, fully implemented, is designed to provide annually updated social, economic, and housing data for states and communities. (Such local-area data have traditionally been collected once every ten years in the long form of the decennial census.)

Data Source: Population Reference Bureau, analysis of data from the U.S. Census Bureau, 2005 through 2015 American Community Survey.

Footnotes: Updated December 2016.
S - Estimates suppressed when the confidence interval around the percentage is greater than or equal to 10 percentage points.
N.A. – Data not available.
A 90 percent confidence interval for each estimate can be found at
  Children by household head’s educational attainment.

Children living in high poverty areas (Number & Percent)

Location Data Type 2007 - 2011 2008 - 2012 2009 - 2013 2010 - 2014 2011 - 2015
United StatesNumber8,591,0009,362,00010,067,00010,333,00010,032,000
United StatesPercent12%13%14%14%14%
IndianaNumber151,000182,000198,000208,000201,000
IndianaPercent9%11%12%13%13%
Location Data Type 2007 - 2011 2008 - 2012 2009 - 2013 2010 - 2014 2011 - 2015
United StatesNumber8,591,0009,362,00010,067,00010,333,00010,032,000
United StatesPercent12%13%14%14%14%
IndianaNumber151,000182,000198,000208,000201,000
IndianaPercent9%11%12%13%13%
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Indicator Context

Concentrated poverty puts whole neighborhoods, and the people living in them, at risk. High-poverty neighborhoods are much more likely than others to have high rates of crime and violence, physical and mental health issues, unemployment and other problems.

This indicator is included in the KIDS COUNT Child Well-Being Index. Read the KIDS COUNT Data Book to learn more: http://datacenter.kidscount.org/publications

Read Data Snapshot on High-Poverty Communities.

Definitions: Children living in census tracts with poverty rates of 30 percent or more.

Research indicates that as neighborhood poverty rates increase, undesirable outcomes rise and opportunities for success are less likely. The effects of concentrated poverty begin to appear once neighborhood poverty rates rise above 20 percent and continue to grow as the concentration of poverty increases up to the 40 percent threshold. This indicator defines areas of concentrated poverty as those census tracts with overall poverty rates of 30 percent or more because it is a commonly used threshold that lies between the starting point and leveling off point for negative neighborhood effects. The 2015 federal poverty threshold is $24,036 per year for a family of two adults and two children.

Data Source:

Population Reference Bureau analysis of data from the U.S. Census Bureau, 2000 Decennial Census Summary File 1 and Summary File 3 and the 2006-2010 to 2011–2015 American Community Survey 5-year data.

Footnotes: Updated January 2017.
S - Estimates suppressed when the confidence interval around the percentage is greater than or equal to 10 percentage points.
N.A. – Data not available.
Data is provided for the 50 most populous cities according to the most recent Census counts. Cities for which data is collected may change over time.
A 90 percent confidence interval for each estimate can be found at:  Children living in high poverty areas.

Children in single-parent families (Number & Percent)

Location Data Type 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015
United StatesNumber24,718,00024,725,00024,647,00024,689,00024,444,000
United StatesPercent35%35%35%35%35%
IndianaNumber534,000519,000520,000539,000519,000
IndianaPercent35%34%35%36%35%
Location Data Type 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015
United StatesNumber24,718,00024,725,00024,647,00024,689,00024,444,000
United StatesPercent35%35%35%35%35%
IndianaNumber534,000519,000520,000539,000519,000
IndianaPercent35%34%35%36%35%
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Indicator Context

Children growing up in single-parent families typically do not have the same economic or human resources available as those growing up in two-parent families. Compared with children in married-couple families, children raised in single-parent households are more likely to drop out of school, to have or cause a teen pregnancy and to experience a divorce in adulthood.

This indicator is included in the KIDS COUNT Child Well-Being Index. Read the KIDS COUNT Data Book to learn more: http://datacenter.kidscount.org/publications.

Definitions: Children under age 18 who live with their own single parent either in a family or subfamily.

In this definition, single-parent families may include cohabiting couples and do not include children living with married stepparents. Children who live in group quarters (for example, institutions, dormitories, or group homes) are not included in this calculation.

Data Source: Population Reference Bureau, analysis of data from the U.S. Census Bureau, Census 2000 Supplementary Survey, 2001 Supplementary Survey and 2002 through 2015 American Community Survey (ACS).


These data were derived from American Fact Finder table C23008 (factfinder2.census.gov/).

The data for this measure come from the 2000 and 2001 Supplementary Survey and the 2002 through 2015 American Community Survey (ACS). The 2000 through 2004 ACS surveyed approximately 700,000 households monthly during each calendar year. In general but particularly for these years, use caution when interpreting estimates for less populous states or indicators representing small sub-populations, where the sample size is relatively small. Beginning in January 2005, the U.S. Census Bureau expanded the ACS sample to 3 million households (full implementation), and in January 2006 the ACS included group quarters. The ACS, fully implemented, is designed to provide annually updated social, economic, and housing data for states and communities. (Such local-area data have traditionally been collected once every ten years in the long form of the decennial census.)

Footnotes: Updated October 2016.
S - Estimates suppressed when the confidence interval around the percentage is greater than or equal to 10 percentage points.
N.A. – Data not available.
Data is provided for the 50 most populous cities according to the most recent Census counts. Cities for which data is collected may change over time.
A 90 percent confidence interval for each estimate can be found at Children in single-parent families.

Children by household head’s educational attainment (Number & Percent)

Location Education Level Data Type 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015
United StatesNot a high school graduateNumber11,131,00010,887,00010,533,00010,412,00010,137,000
United StatesNot a high school graduatePercent15%15%14%14%14%
United StatesHigh school diploma or GEDNumber34,617,00034,157,00033,544,00032,958,00032,801,000
United StatesHigh school diploma or GEDPercent47%46%46%45%45%
United StatesAssociate's degreeNumber6,469,0006,564,0006,690,0006,783,0006,827,000
United StatesAssociate's degreePercent9%9%9%9%9%
United StatesBachelor's degreeNumber13,366,00013,501,00014,044,00014,218,00014,446,000
United StatesBachelor's degreePercent18%18%19%19%20%
United StatesGraduate degreeNumber8,103,0008,387,0008,670,0008,992,0009,210,000
United StatesGraduate degreePercent11%11%12%12%13%
IndianaNot a high school graduateNumber202,000204,000187,000186,000189,000
IndianaNot a high school graduatePercent13%13%12%12%12%
IndianaHigh school diploma or GEDNumber817,000811,000801,000781,000758,000
IndianaHigh school diploma or GEDPercent51%51%50%49%48%
IndianaAssociate's degreeNumber162,000161,000169,000168,000168,000
IndianaAssociate's degreePercent10%10%11%11%11%
IndianaBachelor's degreeNumber275,000273,000285,000297,000313,000
IndianaBachelor's degreePercent17%17%18%19%20%
IndianaGraduate degreeNumber137,000135,000142,000146,000148,000
IndianaGraduate degreePercent9%9%9%9%9%
Location Education Level Data Type 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015
United StatesNot a high school graduateNumber11,131,00010,887,00010,533,00010,412,00010,137,000
United StatesNot a high school graduatePercent15%15%14%14%14%
United StatesHigh school diploma or GEDNumber34,617,00034,157,00033,544,00032,958,00032,801,000
United StatesHigh school diploma or GEDPercent47%46%46%45%45%
United StatesAssociate's degreeNumber6,469,0006,564,0006,690,0006,783,0006,827,000
United StatesAssociate's degreePercent9%9%9%9%9%
United StatesBachelor's degreeNumber13,366,00013,501,00014,044,00014,218,00014,446,000
United StatesBachelor's degreePercent18%18%19%19%20%
United StatesGraduate degreeNumber8,103,0008,387,0008,670,0008,992,0009,210,000
United StatesGraduate degreePercent11%11%12%12%13%
IndianaNot a high school graduateNumber202,000204,000187,000186,000189,000
IndianaNot a high school graduatePercent13%13%12%12%12%
IndianaHigh school diploma or GEDNumber817,000811,000801,000781,000758,000
IndianaHigh school diploma or GEDPercent51%51%50%49%48%
IndianaAssociate's degreeNumber162,000161,000169,000168,000168,000
IndianaAssociate's degreePercent10%10%11%11%11%
IndianaBachelor's degreeNumber275,000273,000285,000297,000313,000
IndianaBachelor's degreePercent17%17%18%19%20%
IndianaGraduate degreeNumber137,000135,000142,000146,000148,000
IndianaGraduate degreePercent9%9%9%9%9%
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Definitions: The share of all children under age 18 living in households by the head of household’s educational attainment.

The data for this measure come from the 2000 and 2001 Supplementary Survey and the 2002 through 2015 American Community Survey (ACS). The 2000 through 2004 ACS surveyed approximately 700,000 households monthly during each calendar year. In general but particularly for these years, use caution when interpreting estimates for less populous states or indicators representing small subpopulations, where the sample size is relatively small. Beginning in January 2005, the U.S. Census Bureau expanded the ACS sample to 3 million households (full implementation), and in January 2006 the ACS included group quarters. The ACS, fully implemented, is designed to provide annually updated social, economic, and housing data for states and communities. (Such local-area data have traditionally been collected once every ten years in the long form of the decennial census.)

Data Source: Population Reference Bureau, analysis of data from the U.S. Census Bureau, 2005 through 2015 American Community Survey.

Footnotes: Updated December 2016.
S - Estimates suppressed when the confidence interval around the percentage is greater than or equal to 10 percentage points.
N.A. – Data not available.
A 90 percent confidence interval for each estimate can be found at
  Children by household head’s educational attainment.

Low-birthweight babies (Number & Percent)

Location Data Type 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015
United StatesNumber319,711315,709315,099318,847320,869
United StatesPercent8.1%8.0%8.0%8.0%8.1%
IndianaNumber6,7866,5556,5696,7156,725
IndianaPercent8.1%7.9%7.9%8.0%8.0%
Location Data Type 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015
United StatesNumber319,711315,709315,099318,847320,869
United StatesPercent8.1%8.0%8.0%8.0%8.1%
IndianaNumber6,7866,5556,5696,7156,725
IndianaPercent8.1%7.9%7.9%8.0%8.0%
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Indicator Context

Babies born with a low birthweight have a high probability of experiencing developmental problems and short- and long-term disabilities and are at greater risk of dying within the first year of life. Smoking, poor nutrition, poverty, stress, infections and violence can increase the risk of a baby being born with a low birthweight.

This indicator is included in the KIDS COUNT Child Well-Being Index. Read the KIDS COUNT Data Book to learn more: http://datacenter.kidscount.org/publications.

Definitions: Live births weighing less than 2,500 grams (5.5 pounds).

The data reflect the mother’s place of residence, not the place where the birth occurred. Births of unknown weight were not included in these calculations. Puerto Rico and Virgin Islands are not included in the U.S. Average.

Data Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics.
1990 through 2015 state-level estimates are from the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS), National Vital Statistics Reports or can be accessed through the CDC Wonder system. City-level estimates are from public use micro-data files provided by NCHS.

Footnotes: Updated May 2017.
S – NCHS reporting standards not met.
N.A. – Data not available.

Child and teen death rate (Number & Rate per 100,000)

Location Data Type 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015
United StatesNumber20,24119,49218,88818,66619,562
United StatesRate per 100,0002625242425
IndianaNumber489461505449515
IndianaRate per 100,0002927302731
Location Data Type 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015
United StatesNumber20,24119,49218,88818,66619,562
United StatesRate per 100,0002625242425
IndianaNumber489461505449515
IndianaRate per 100,0002927302731
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Indicator Context

The child and teen death rate reflects a broad array of factors: physical and mental health; access to health care; community factors; use of safety practices and the level of adult supervision. Accidents, primarily those involving motor vehicles, are the leading cause of death for children and youth.

This indicator is included in the KIDS COUNT Child Well-Being Index. Read the KIDS COUNT Data Book to learn more: http://datacenter.kidscount.org/publications.

Definitions: Deaths to children between ages 1 and 19, from all causes, per 100,000 children in this age range.
The data are reported by the place of residence, not the place where the death occurred.

Data Source: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS).
Population Reference Bureau, analysis of data from the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics, Multiple Causes of Death Public Use Files for 2005-2015 CD-Rom.

Population Statistics: U.S. Census Bureau
2005-2015 data: State Characteristics Population Estimates File, accessed online.

Footnotes: Updated May 2017.
S – NCHS reporting standards not met.
N.A. – Data not available.

Economic Well-Being Rank (Number)

Location Data Type 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017
IndianaNumber2619232419
Location Data Type 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017
IndianaNumber2619232419
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Definitions: Economic Ranks for 2017 for each state using a consistent set of economic indicators; namely those used to derive the rank reported in the 2017 KIDS COUNT Data Book.

The Economic Rank for each state was obtained in the following manner. First, we converted the 2015 (or 2014/2015, depending on the indicator) state numerical values for each of the 4 key indicators within each domain into standard scores. We summed those standard scores in each domain to get a total standard score for each state. Finally, we ranked the states on the basis of their total standard score by domain in sequential order from highest/best (1) to lowest/worst (50). Standard scores were derived by subtracting the mean score from the observed score and dividing the amount by the standard deviation for that distribution of scores. All measures were given the same weight in calculating the domain standard score.

Data Source: Population Reference Bureau, analysis of data gathered for the 2017 KIDS COUNT Data Book.

Footnotes: Updated June 2017.

Health rank (Number)

Location Data Type 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017
IndianaNumber2426353135
Location Data Type 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017
IndianaNumber2426353135
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Definitions: Health Ranks for 2017 for each state using a consistent set of economic indicators; namely those used to derive the rank reported in the 2017 KIDS COUNT Data Book.

The Health Rank for each state was obtained in the following manner. First, we converted the 2015 (or 2014/2015, depending on the indicator) state numerical values for each of the 4 key indicators within each domain into standard scores. We summed those standard scores in each domain to get a total standard score for each state. Finally, we ranked the states on the basis of their total standard score by domain in sequential order from highest/best (1) to lowest/worst (50). Standard scores were derived by subtracting the mean score from the observed score and dividing the amount by the standard deviation for that distribution of scores. All measures were given the same weight in calculating the domain standard score.

Data Source: Population Reference Bureau, analysis of data gathered for the 2017 KIDS COUNT Data Book.

Footnotes: Updated June 2017.

Family and community rank (Number)

Location Data Type 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017
IndianaNumber3031313231
Location Data Type 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017
IndianaNumber3031313231
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Definitions: Family and Community Ranks for 2017 for each state using a consistent set of economic indicators; namely those used to derive the rank reported in the 2017 KIDS COUNT Data Book.

The Family and Community Rank for each state was obtained in the following manner. First, we converted the 2015 (or 2014/2015, depending on the indicator) state numerical values for each of the 4 key indicators within each domain into standard scores. We summed those standard scores in each domain to get a total standard score for each state. Finally, we ranked the states on the basis of their total standard score by domain in sequential order from highest/best (1) to lowest/worst (50). Standard scores were derived by subtracting the mean score from the observed score and dividing the amount by the standard deviation for that distribution of scores. All measures were given the same weight in calculating the domain standard score.

Data Source: Population Reference Bureau, analysis of data gathered for the 2017 KIDS COUNT Data Book.

Footnotes: Updated June 2017.

Children in poverty (100 percent poverty) (Number & Percent)

Location Data Type 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015
United StatesNumber16,387,00016,397,00016,087,00015,686,00015,000,000
United StatesPercent23%23%22%22%21%
IndianaNumber361,000350,000345,000333,000323,000
IndianaPercent23%22%22%22%21%
Location Data Type 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015
United StatesNumber16,387,00016,397,00016,087,00015,686,00015,000,000
United StatesPercent23%23%22%22%21%
IndianaNumber361,000350,000345,000333,000323,000
IndianaPercent23%22%22%22%21%
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Indicator Context

Growing up in poverty is one of the greatest threats to healthy child development. Poverty and financial stress can impede children’s cognitive development and their ability to learn. It can contribute to behavioral, social and emotional problems and poor health.

This indicator is included in the KIDS COUNT Child Well-Being Index. Read the KIDS COUNT Data Book to learn more: http://datacenter.kidscount.org/publications.

Definitions: The share of children under age 18 who live in families with incomes below the federal poverty level.

The federal poverty definition consists of a series of thresholds based on family size and composition. In calendar year 2015, a family of two adults and two children fell in the “poverty” category if their annual income fell below $24,036. Poverty status is not determined for people in military barracks, institutional quarters, or for unrelated individuals under age 15 (such as foster children).  The data are based on income received in the 12 months prior to the survey.

Data Source: Population Reference Bureau, analysis of data from the U.S. Census Bureau, Census 2000 Supplementary Survey, 2001 Supplementary Survey, 2002 through 2015 American Community Survey.

These data were derived from American Fact Finder table B17001 (factfinder2.census.gov/).


The data for this measure come from the 2000 and 2001 Supplementary Survey and the 2002 through 2015 American Community Survey (ACS). The 2000 through 2004 ACS surveyed approximately 700,000 households monthly during each calendar year. In general but particularly for these years, use caution when interpreting estimates for less populous states or indicators representing small sub-populations, where the sample size is relatively small. Beginning in January 2005, the U.S. Census Bureau expanded the ACS sample to 3 million households (full implementation), and in January 2006 the ACS included group quarters. The ACS, fully implemented, is designed to provide annually updated social, economic, and housing data for states and communities. (Such local-area data have traditionally been collected once every ten years in the long form of the decennial census.)

Footnotes: Updated September 2016.
S - Estimates suppressed when the confidence interval around the percentage is greater than or equal to 10 percentage points.
N.A. – Data not available.
Data are provided for the 50 most populous cities according to the most recent Census counts.  Cities for which data is collected may change over time.
A 90 percent confidence interval for each estimate can be found at Children in poverty (100 percent poverty).

Children whose parents lack secure employment (Number & Percent)

Location Data Type 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015
United StatesNumber23,777,00023,101,00022,837,00022,061,00021,363,000
United StatesPercent32%31%31%30%29%
IndianaNumber527,000474,000475,000474,000447,000
IndianaPercent33%30%30%30%28%
Location Data Type 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015
United StatesNumber23,777,00023,101,00022,837,00022,061,00021,363,000
United StatesPercent32%31%31%30%29%
IndianaNumber527,000474,000475,000474,000447,000
IndianaPercent33%30%30%30%28%
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Indicator Context

Children living in families lacking secure parental employment are vulnerable. Without at least one parent employed full time, children are more likely to fall into poverty. Yet too many parents who want full-time work are forced to piece together part-time or temporary jobs that do not provide sufficient or stable income; some lack the education and skills needed to secure a good job. Even a full-time job at low wages does not necessarily lift a family out of poverty.

This indicator is part of the KIDS COUNT Child Well-Being Index. Read the KIDS COUNT Data Book to learn more: http://datacenter.kidscount.org/publications.

Definitions: The share of all children under age 18 living in families where no parent has regular, full-time employment.

For children living in single-parent families, this means the resident parent did not work at least 35 hours per week, at least 50 weeks in the 12 months prior to the survey. For children living in married-couple families, this means neither parent worked at least 35 hours per week, at least 50 weeks in the 12 months prior to the survey. Children living with neither parent were listed as not having secure parental employment because those children are likely to be economically vulnerable. Children under age 18 who are householders, spouses of householders, or unmarried partners of householders were excluded from this analysis. This measure is very similar to the measure called "Secure Parental Employment," used by the Federal Interagency Forum on Child and Family Statistics in its publication America's Children: Key National Indicators of Well-Being.

Data Source: Population Reference Bureau, analysis of data from the U.S. Census Bureau, 2008 - 2015 American Community Survey.

Footnotes: Updated December 2016.
S – Estimates suppressed when the confidence interval around the percentage is greater than or equal to 10 percentage points.
N.A. – Data not available.
Data are provided for the 50 most populous cities according to the most recent Census counts.  Cities for which data is collected may change over time.
A 90 percent confidence interval for each estimate can be found at Children whose parents lack secure employment.

Children living in households with a high housing cost burden (Number & Percent)

Location Data Type 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015
United StatesNumber29,486,00027,761,00026,339,00025,710,00024,646,000
United StatesPercent40%38%36%35%33%
IndianaNumber487,000450,000437,000434,000399,000
IndianaPercent31%28%28%27%25%
Location Data Type 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015
United StatesNumber29,486,00027,761,00026,339,00025,710,00024,646,000
United StatesPercent40%38%36%35%33%
IndianaNumber487,000450,000437,000434,000399,000
IndianaPercent31%28%28%27%25%
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Indicator Context

Family income is only one factor of financial security; the cost of basic expenses also matters. Housing is typically one of the largest expenses that families face. Low-income families, in particular, are unlikely to be able to meet all of their basic needs if housing consumes nearly one-third or more of their income.

This indicator is included in the KIDS COUNT Child Well-Being Index. Read the KIDS COUNT Data Book to learn more: http://datacenter.kidscount.org/publications.

Definitions: The share of children living in households where more than 30 percent of the monthly income was spent on rent, mortgage payments, taxes, insurance, and/or related expenses.

The 30 percent threshold for housing costs is based on research on affordable housing by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban development (HUD). According to HUD, households that must allocate more than 30 percent of their income to housing expenses are less likely to have enough resources for food, clothing, medical care or other needs.

Data Source: Population Reference Bureau, analysis of data from the U.S. Census Bureau, 2005 through 2015 American Community Survey.
Beginning in January 2005, the U.S. Census Bureau expanded the ACS sample to 3 million households (full implementation), and in January 2006 the ACS included group quarters. The ACS, fully implemented, is designed to provide annually updated social, economic, and housing data for states and communities. (Such local-area data have traditionally been collected once every ten years in the long form of the decennial census.)

Footnotes: Updated December 2016.
S - Estimates suppressed when the confidence interval around the
percentage is greater than or equal to 10 percentage points.
N.A. – Data not available.
Data are provided for the 50 most populous cities according to the most recent Census counts.  Cities for which data is collected may change over time.
A 90 percent confidence interval for each estimate can be found at
Children living in households with a high housing cost burden .

Fourth grade reading achievement levels (Percent)

Location Achievement Level Data Type 2007 2009 2011 2013 2015
United StatesBelow basicPercent34%34%34%33%32%
United StatesAt or above basicPercent66%66%66%67%68%
United StatesBelow proficientPercent68%68%68%66%65%
United StatesAt or above proficientPercent32%32%32%34%35%
IndianaBelow basicPercent32%30%32%27%25%
IndianaAt or above basicPercent68%70%68%73%75%
IndianaBelow proficientPercent67%66%67%62%60%
IndianaAt or above proficientPercent33%34%33%38%40%
Location Achievement Level Data Type 2007 2009 2011 2013 2015
United StatesBelow basicPercent34%34%34%33%32%
United StatesAt or above basicPercent66%66%66%67%68%
United StatesBelow proficientPercent68%68%68%66%65%
United StatesAt or above proficientPercent32%32%32%34%35%
IndianaBelow basicPercent32%30%32%27%25%
IndianaAt or above basicPercent68%70%68%73%75%
IndianaBelow proficientPercent67%66%67%62%60%
IndianaAt or above proficientPercent33%34%33%38%40%
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Indicator Context

Proficiency in reading by the end of third grade is a crucial marker in a child's educational development. In the early years, learning to read is a critical component of education. But beginning in fourth grade, children use reading to learn other subjects, and therefore, mastery of reading becomes a critical component in their ability to keep up academically. Children who reach fourth grade without being able to read proficiently are more likely to drop out of high school, reducing their earnings potential and changes for success.

This indicator is part of the KIDS COUNT Child Well-Being Index. Read our KIDS COUNT Data Book to learn more about how children are faring.

Additional resources:
Early Warning Confirmed: A Research Update on Third-Grade Reading 2010 KIDS COUNT Special Report: Why Reading by the End of Third Grade Matters

Definitions: Fourth grade public school students’ reading achievement levels, as measured and defined by the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) reading test.

For a more detailed description of achievement levels see: http://nces.ed.gov/nationsreportcard/Reading/achieveall.asp. Public schools include charter schools and exclude Bureau of Indian Education schools and Department of Defense Education Activity schools.

Data Source: U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics, National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP).  Available online at http://nces.ed.gov/nationsreportcard/.

Footnotes: Updated November 2015.
S – NAEP reporting standards not met.
N.A. – Data not available.
A 90 percent confidence interval file may be found at Fourth grade reading achievement levels.

Eighth grade math achievement levels (Percent)

Location Achievement Level Data Type 2007 2009 2011 2013 2015
United StatesBelow basicPercent30%29%28%27%30%
United StatesAt or above basicPercent70%71%72%73%70%
United StatesBelow proficientPercent69%67%66%66%68%
United StatesAt or above proficientPercent31%33%34%34%32%
IndianaBelow basicPercent24%22%23%23%23%
IndianaAt or above basicPercent76%78%77%77%77%
IndianaBelow proficientPercent65%64%66%62%61%
IndianaAt or above proficientPercent35%36%34%38%39%
Location Achievement Level Data Type 2007 2009 2011 2013 2015
United StatesBelow basicPercent30%29%28%27%30%
United StatesAt or above basicPercent70%71%72%73%70%
United StatesBelow proficientPercent69%67%66%66%68%
United StatesAt or above proficientPercent31%33%34%34%32%
IndianaBelow basicPercent24%22%23%23%23%
IndianaAt or above basicPercent76%78%77%77%77%
IndianaBelow proficientPercent65%64%66%62%61%
IndianaAt or above proficientPercent35%36%34%38%39%
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Indicator Context

Competence in mathematics is essential for success in the workplace, which increasingly requires higher-level technical skills. Students who take advanced math and science courses that require a strong mastery of math fundamentals are more likely to attend and complete college and have higher earnings over time.

This indicator is included in the KIDS COUNT Child Well-Being Index. Read the KIDS COUNT Data Book to learn more: http://datacenter.kidscount.org/publications.

Definitions: Eighth grade public school students’ mathematics achievement levels, as measured and defined by the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP).
For a more detailed description of achievement levels see: http://nces.ed.gov/nationsreportcard/Mathematics/achieveall.asp. Public schools include charter schools and exclude Bureau of Indian Education schools and Department of Defense Education Activity schools.

Data Source: U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics, National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP). Available online at http://nces.ed.gov/nationsreportcard

Footnotes: Updated November 2015.
S – NAEP reporting standards not met.
N.A. – Data not available.
A 90 percent confidence interval for each estimate can be found at Eighth grade math achievement levels.

Low-birthweight babies (Number & Percent)

Location Data Type 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015
United StatesNumber319,711315,709315,099318,847320,869
United StatesPercent8.1%8.0%8.0%8.0%8.1%
IndianaNumber6,7866,5556,5696,7156,725
IndianaPercent8.1%7.9%7.9%8.0%8.0%
Location Data Type 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015
United StatesNumber319,711315,709315,099318,847320,869
United StatesPercent8.1%8.0%8.0%8.0%8.1%
IndianaNumber6,7866,5556,5696,7156,725
IndianaPercent8.1%7.9%7.9%8.0%8.0%
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Indicator Context

Babies born with a low birthweight have a high probability of experiencing developmental problems and short- and long-term disabilities and are at greater risk of dying within the first year of life. Smoking, poor nutrition, poverty, stress, infections and violence can increase the risk of a baby being born with a low birthweight.

This indicator is included in the KIDS COUNT Child Well-Being Index. Read the KIDS COUNT Data Book to learn more: http://datacenter.kidscount.org/publications.

Definitions: Live births weighing less than 2,500 grams (5.5 pounds).

The data reflect the mother’s place of residence, not the place where the birth occurred. Births of unknown weight were not included in these calculations. Puerto Rico and Virgin Islands are not included in the U.S. Average.

Data Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics.
1990 through 2015 state-level estimates are from the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS), National Vital Statistics Reports or can be accessed through the CDC Wonder system. City-level estimates are from public use micro-data files provided by NCHS.

Footnotes: Updated May 2017.
S – NCHS reporting standards not met.
N.A. – Data not available.

Child and teen death rate (Number & Rate per 100,000)

Location Data Type 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015
United StatesNumber20,24119,49218,88818,66619,562
United StatesRate per 100,0002625242425
IndianaNumber489461505449515
IndianaRate per 100,0002927302731
Location Data Type 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015
United StatesNumber20,24119,49218,88818,66619,562
United StatesRate per 100,0002625242425
IndianaNumber489461505449515
IndianaRate per 100,0002927302731
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Indicator Context

The child and teen death rate reflects a broad array of factors: physical and mental health; access to health care; community factors; use of safety practices and the level of adult supervision. Accidents, primarily those involving motor vehicles, are the leading cause of death for children and youth.

This indicator is included in the KIDS COUNT Child Well-Being Index. Read the KIDS COUNT Data Book to learn more: http://datacenter.kidscount.org/publications.

Definitions: Deaths to children between ages 1 and 19, from all causes, per 100,000 children in this age range.
The data are reported by the place of residence, not the place where the death occurred.

Data Source: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS).
Population Reference Bureau, analysis of data from the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics, Multiple Causes of Death Public Use Files for 2005-2015 CD-Rom.

Population Statistics: U.S. Census Bureau
2005-2015 data: State Characteristics Population Estimates File, accessed online.

Footnotes: Updated May 2017.
S – NCHS reporting standards not met.
N.A. – Data not available.

Children in single-parent families (Number & Percent)

Location Data Type 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015
United StatesNumber24,718,00024,725,00024,647,00024,689,00024,444,000
United StatesPercent35%35%35%35%35%
IndianaNumber534,000519,000520,000539,000519,000
IndianaPercent35%34%35%36%35%
Location Data Type 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015
United StatesNumber24,718,00024,725,00024,647,00024,689,00024,444,000
United StatesPercent35%35%35%35%35%
IndianaNumber534,000519,000520,000539,000519,000
IndianaPercent35%34%35%36%35%
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Indicator Context

Children growing up in single-parent families typically do not have the same economic or human resources available as those growing up in two-parent families. Compared with children in married-couple families, children raised in single-parent households are more likely to drop out of school, to have or cause a teen pregnancy and to experience a divorce in adulthood.

This indicator is included in the KIDS COUNT Child Well-Being Index. Read the KIDS COUNT Data Book to learn more: http://datacenter.kidscount.org/publications.

Definitions: Children under age 18 who live with their own single parent either in a family or subfamily.

In this definition, single-parent families may include cohabiting couples and do not include children living with married stepparents. Children who live in group quarters (for example, institutions, dormitories, or group homes) are not included in this calculation.

Data Source: Population Reference Bureau, analysis of data from the U.S. Census Bureau, Census 2000 Supplementary Survey, 2001 Supplementary Survey and 2002 through 2015 American Community Survey (ACS).


These data were derived from American Fact Finder table C23008 (factfinder2.census.gov/).

The data for this measure come from the 2000 and 2001 Supplementary Survey and the 2002 through 2015 American Community Survey (ACS). The 2000 through 2004 ACS surveyed approximately 700,000 households monthly during each calendar year. In general but particularly for these years, use caution when interpreting estimates for less populous states or indicators representing small sub-populations, where the sample size is relatively small. Beginning in January 2005, the U.S. Census Bureau expanded the ACS sample to 3 million households (full implementation), and in January 2006 the ACS included group quarters. The ACS, fully implemented, is designed to provide annually updated social, economic, and housing data for states and communities. (Such local-area data have traditionally been collected once every ten years in the long form of the decennial census.)

Footnotes: Updated October 2016.
S - Estimates suppressed when the confidence interval around the percentage is greater than or equal to 10 percentage points.
N.A. – Data not available.
Data is provided for the 50 most populous cities according to the most recent Census counts. Cities for which data is collected may change over time.
A 90 percent confidence interval for each estimate can be found at Children in single-parent families.

Children by household head’s educational attainment (Number & Percent)

Location Education Level Data Type 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015
United StatesNot a high school graduateNumber11,131,00010,887,00010,533,00010,412,00010,137,000
United StatesNot a high school graduatePercent15%15%14%14%14%
United StatesHigh school diploma or GEDNumber34,617,00034,157,00033,544,00032,958,00032,801,000
United StatesHigh school diploma or GEDPercent47%46%46%45%45%
United StatesAssociate's degreeNumber6,469,0006,564,0006,690,0006,783,0006,827,000
United StatesAssociate's degreePercent9%9%9%9%9%
United StatesBachelor's degreeNumber13,366,00013,501,00014,044,00014,218,00014,446,000
United StatesBachelor's degreePercent18%18%19%19%20%
United StatesGraduate degreeNumber8,103,0008,387,0008,670,0008,992,0009,210,000
United StatesGraduate degreePercent11%11%12%12%13%
IndianaNot a high school graduateNumber202,000204,000187,000186,000189,000
IndianaNot a high school graduatePercent13%13%12%12%12%
IndianaHigh school diploma or GEDNumber817,000811,000801,000781,000758,000
IndianaHigh school diploma or GEDPercent51%51%50%49%48%
IndianaAssociate's degreeNumber162,000161,000169,000168,000168,000
IndianaAssociate's degreePercent10%10%11%11%11%
IndianaBachelor's degreeNumber275,000273,000285,000297,000313,000
IndianaBachelor's degreePercent17%17%18%19%20%
IndianaGraduate degreeNumber137,000135,000142,000146,000148,000
IndianaGraduate degreePercent9%9%9%9%9%
Location Education Level Data Type 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015
United StatesNot a high school graduateNumber11,131,00010,887,00010,533,00010,412,00010,137,000
United StatesNot a high school graduatePercent15%15%14%14%14%
United StatesHigh school diploma or GEDNumber34,617,00034,157,00033,544,00032,958,00032,801,000
United StatesHigh school diploma or GEDPercent47%46%46%45%45%
United StatesAssociate's degreeNumber6,469,0006,564,0006,690,0006,783,0006,827,000
United StatesAssociate's degreePercent9%9%9%9%9%
United StatesBachelor's degreeNumber13,366,00013,501,00014,044,00014,218,00014,446,000
United StatesBachelor's degreePercent18%18%19%19%20%
United StatesGraduate degreeNumber8,103,0008,387,0008,670,0008,992,0009,210,000
United StatesGraduate degreePercent11%11%12%12%13%
IndianaNot a high school graduateNumber202,000204,000187,000186,000189,000
IndianaNot a high school graduatePercent13%13%12%12%12%
IndianaHigh school diploma or GEDNumber817,000811,000801,000781,000758,000
IndianaHigh school diploma or GEDPercent51%51%50%49%48%
IndianaAssociate's degreeNumber162,000161,000169,000168,000168,000
IndianaAssociate's degreePercent10%10%11%11%11%
IndianaBachelor's degreeNumber275,000273,000285,000297,000313,000
IndianaBachelor's degreePercent17%17%18%19%20%
IndianaGraduate degreeNumber137,000135,000142,000146,000148,000
IndianaGraduate degreePercent9%9%9%9%9%
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Definitions: The share of all children under age 18 living in households by the head of household’s educational attainment.

The data for this measure come from the 2000 and 2001 Supplementary Survey and the 2002 through 2015 American Community Survey (ACS). The 2000 through 2004 ACS surveyed approximately 700,000 households monthly during each calendar year. In general but particularly for these years, use caution when interpreting estimates for less populous states or indicators representing small subpopulations, where the sample size is relatively small. Beginning in January 2005, the U.S. Census Bureau expanded the ACS sample to 3 million households (full implementation), and in January 2006 the ACS included group quarters. The ACS, fully implemented, is designed to provide annually updated social, economic, and housing data for states and communities. (Such local-area data have traditionally been collected once every ten years in the long form of the decennial census.)

Data Source: Population Reference Bureau, analysis of data from the U.S. Census Bureau, 2005 through 2015 American Community Survey.

Footnotes: Updated December 2016.
S - Estimates suppressed when the confidence interval around the percentage is greater than or equal to 10 percentage points.
N.A. – Data not available.
A 90 percent confidence interval for each estimate can be found at
  Children by household head’s educational attainment.

Children living in high poverty areas (Number & Percent)

Location Data Type 2007 - 2011 2008 - 2012 2009 - 2013 2010 - 2014 2011 - 2015
United StatesNumber8,591,0009,362,00010,067,00010,333,00010,032,000
United StatesPercent12%13%14%14%14%
IndianaNumber151,000182,000198,000208,000201,000
IndianaPercent9%11%12%13%13%
Location Data Type 2007 - 2011 2008 - 2012 2009 - 2013 2010 - 2014 2011 - 2015
United StatesNumber8,591,0009,362,00010,067,00010,333,00010,032,000
United StatesPercent12%13%14%14%14%
IndianaNumber151,000182,000198,000208,000201,000
IndianaPercent9%11%12%13%13%
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Indicator Context

Concentrated poverty puts whole neighborhoods, and the people living in them, at risk. High-poverty neighborhoods are much more likely than others to have high rates of crime and violence, physical and mental health issues, unemployment and other problems.

This indicator is included in the KIDS COUNT Child Well-Being Index. Read the KIDS COUNT Data Book to learn more: http://datacenter.kidscount.org/publications

Read Data Snapshot on High-Poverty Communities.

Definitions: Children living in census tracts with poverty rates of 30 percent or more.

Research indicates that as neighborhood poverty rates increase, undesirable outcomes rise and opportunities for success are less likely. The effects of concentrated poverty begin to appear once neighborhood poverty rates rise above 20 percent and continue to grow as the concentration of poverty increases up to the 40 percent threshold. This indicator defines areas of concentrated poverty as those census tracts with overall poverty rates of 30 percent or more because it is a commonly used threshold that lies between the starting point and leveling off point for negative neighborhood effects. The 2015 federal poverty threshold is $24,036 per year for a family of two adults and two children.

Data Source:

Population Reference Bureau analysis of data from the U.S. Census Bureau, 2000 Decennial Census Summary File 1 and Summary File 3 and the 2006-2010 to 2011–2015 American Community Survey 5-year data.

Footnotes: Updated January 2017.
S - Estimates suppressed when the confidence interval around the percentage is greater than or equal to 10 percentage points.
N.A. – Data not available.
Data is provided for the 50 most populous cities according to the most recent Census counts. Cities for which data is collected may change over time.
A 90 percent confidence interval for each estimate can be found at:  Children living in high poverty areas.