Selected KIDS COUNT Indicators for Nation in United States

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Children ages 0 to 8 below 200 percent poverty (Number & Percent)

Location Data Type 2005 2012 2013 2014 2015
United StatesNumber15,153,00017,215,00016,897,00016,736,00016,186,000
United StatesPercent43%48%47%47%45%
Location Data Type 2005 2012 2013 2014 2015
United StatesNumber15,153,00017,215,00016,897,00016,736,00016,186,000
United StatesPercent43%48%47%47%45%
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Definitions: The share of children age 8 and under who live in families with incomes below the federal poverty level.
The federal poverty definition consists of a series of thresholds based on family size and composition. In 2015, a 200% poverty threshold for a family of two adults and two children was $48,072. Poverty status is not determined for people in military barracks, institutional quarters, or for unrelated individuals under age 15 (such as foster children). The data are based on income received in the 12 months prior to the survey.

Data Source: Population Reference Bureau, analysis of data from the U.S. Census Bureau, 2005 and 2012 through 2015 American Community Survey.

The data for this measure come from the 2005 and 2012 through 2015 American Community Survey (ACS). Beginning in January 2005, the U.S. Census Bureau expanded the ACS sample to 3 million households (full implementation), and in January 2006 the ACS included group quarters. The ACS, fully implemented, is designed to provide annually updated social, economic, and housing data for states and communities. (Such local-area data have traditionally been collected once every ten years in the long form of the decennial census.)

Footnotes: Updated December 2016.
S - Estimates suppressed when the confidence interval around the percentage is greater than or equal to 10 percentage points.
N.A. – Data not available.
A 90 percent confidence interval for each estimate can be found at
Children ages 0 to 8 below 200 percent poverty .

Children ages 0 to 8 at or above 200 percent poverty (Number & Percent)

Location Data Type 2005 2012 2013 2014 2015
United StatesNumber20,412,00018,593,00018,809,00018,929,00019,438,000
United StatesPercent57%52%53%53%55%
Location Data Type 2005 2012 2013 2014 2015
United StatesNumber20,412,00018,593,00018,809,00018,929,00019,438,000
United StatesPercent57%52%53%53%55%
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Definitions: The share of children age 8 and under who live in families with incomes below the federal poverty level.
The federal poverty definition consists of a series of thresholds based on family size and composition. In 2015, a 200% poverty threshold for a family of two adults and two children was $48,072. Poverty status is not determined for people in military barracks, institutional quarters, or for unrelated individuals under age 15 (such as foster children). The data are based on income received in the 12 months prior to the survey.

Data Source: Population Reference Bureau, analysis of data from the U.S. Census Bureau, 2005 and 2012 through 2015 American Community Survey.

The data for this measure come from the 2005 and 2012 through 2015 American Community Survey (ACS). Beginning in January 2005, the U.S. Census Bureau expanded the ACS sample to 3 million households (full implementation), and in January 2006 the ACS included group quarters. The ACS, fully implemented, is designed to provide annually updated social, economic, and housing data for states and communities. (Such local-area data have traditionally been collected once every ten years in the long form of the decennial census.)

Footnotes: Updated December 2016.
S - Estimates suppressed when the confidence interval around the percentage is greater than or equal to 10 percentage points.
N.A. – Data not available.
A 90 percent confidence interval for each estimate can be found at Children ages 0 to 8 at or above 200 percent poverty .

Children under age 6 whose parents had predictive concerns about their development (Percent & Number)

Location Data Type 2011 - 2012
United StatesPercent26%
United StatesNumber5,948,471
Location Data Type 2011 - 2012
United StatesPercent26%
United StatesNumber5,948,471
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Definitions:  Parents of children ages 4 months to 5 years are concerned about their childs development.
Eight questions were asked of parents of children ages 4 months to 5 years.  Parents who answered all questions and who answered "a lot" or "a little"  to any question considered predictive for the age of their child were included in this measure. The questions asked were:
"Are you concerned a lot, a little, or not at all about how he/she talks and makes speech sounds?" (predictive at 4 months- 5 years)
"Are you concerned a lot, a little, or not at all about how he/she understands what you say?" (predictive at 18 months-5 years)
"Are you concerned a lot, a little, or not at all about how he/she uses his/her hands and fingers to do things?" (predictive at 5 years)
"Are you concerned a lot, a little, or not at all about how he/she uses his/her arms and legs?" (predictive at 3 to 5 years)
"Are you concerned a lot, a little, or not at all about how he/she behaves?" (never predictive)
"Are you concerned a lot, a little, or not at all about how he/she gets along with others?" (predictive at 4 months- 17 months)
"Are you concerned a lot, a little, or not at all about how he/she is learning to do things for himself/herself?" (never predictive)
"Are you concerned a lot, a little, or not at all about how he/she is learning pre-school or school skills?" (predictive at 5 years)

The last two questions were not asked of all ages.

Data Source: Child Trends analysis of data from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Health Resources and Services Administration, Maternal and Child Health Bureau, National Survey of Children’s Health (NSCH). For information on the NSCH, see http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/about/major/slaits/nsch.htm.

Footnotes: Data for the 2011-2012 NSCH were collected February 2011 through June 2012.
Data were not collected for Puerto Rico.

Children under age 6 who received a developmental screening (Percent & Number)

Location Data Type 2011 - 2012
United StatesPercent30%
United StatesNumber6,132,446
Location Data Type 2011 - 2012
United StatesPercent30%
United StatesNumber6,132,446
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Definitions: Parents of children ages 10 months to 5 years who had ever filled out a screener from a medical professional about specific concerns the parent may have had about the child's development, communication, or social behavior. 

The screener was considered valid only if it included the parent's concerns about how the child talks or makes speech sounds, and about how the child interacts with the parent and others (for children under 2 years), or included the parent's concerns about the words and phrases the child uses and understands and how the child behaves and gets along with the parent and others (for children ages 2 through 5 years).   Children were automatically considered to have not received a screener if they had not seen a medical professional in the past year.

Data Source: Child Trends analysis of data from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Health Resources and Services Administration, Maternal and Child Health Bureau, National Survey of Children’s Health (NSCH). For information on the NSCH, see http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/about/major/slaits/nsch.htm.

Footnotes: Data for the 2011-2012 NSCH were collected February 2011 through June 2012.
Data were not collected from Puerto Rico.

Children ages birth to 3 whose parent did not receive a new parent home visit (Percent & Number)

Location Data Type 2011 - 2012
United StatesPercent86%
United StatesNumber13,546,490
Location Data Type 2011 - 2012
United StatesPercent86%
United StatesNumber13,546,490
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Definitions: Children under age four whose mothers did not receive a visit at home from someone with a new-parent program, either when she was pregnant or afterward.

Data Source: Child Trends analysis of data from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Health Resources and Services Administration, Maternal and Child Health Bureau, National Survey of Children’s Health (NSCH). For more information on the NSCH, see http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/about/major/slaits/nsch.htm.

Data for the 2011-2012 NSCH were collected February 2011 through June 2012.

Footnotes: RSE is the standard error divided by the estimated proportion.  In Georgia and Texas, RSE was greater than 30% because home visiting was infrequent, and data were not included.
Data were not collected for Puerto Rico.